Dining outdoors at Riverside.

Riverside

written by Kerry Newberry photography by Amy Robb When chef Mark DeResta talks about his restaurant kitchen, he describes it as a culinary incubator. For more than fifteen years, he’s leveraged his all-day dining program to bolster surrounding micro-farmers, makers and producers. “We want to help share their story,” said DeResta. Locals in the know beeline to this under-the-radar Hood River spot: Here you can catch sunsets from an outdoor terrace elegantly tiered above the Columbia River, not to mention spy ospreys swooping for fish. But what really sets this hotel restaurant apart is how it’s so deeply rooted to the surrounding community. On a recent morning, DeResta swapped tales with Rebbecah Winnier, a third-generation tribal fisher from the Yakama Nation, as she delivered glistening Chinook salmon she caught hours before from the Columbia River. Soon after, he mingled with other regulars swinging by with everything from organically grown mushrooms…

McCredie Hot Springs is just east of Eugene and along Salt Creek.

Oregon Hot Springs

Four places around Oregon with very different vibes for your relaxation written by Jen Sotolongo Hot tubs are great, but there’s nothing quite as idyllic as soaking in a natural hot spring in the woods in the middle of nowhere. Thanks to the volcanic mountains that run throughout the state, Oregon is home to a number of hot springs. Ranging from luxurious resorts to rustic soaking pools situated in far-off destinations, these natural hot springs offer a relaxing excursion. Whether you are looking for a unique adventure or seeking a therapeutic wilderness retreat, Oregon’s hot springs will leave you in pure bliss. WILLAMETTE VALLEY AREA Breitenbush Hot Springs Breitenbush Hot Springs offers a remote and tranquil escape nestled amidst the picturesque beauty of the Mount Jefferson wilderness. In 2020 the Lionshead Fire, one of the most destructive fires in Oregon’s history, ripped through the resort, burning down 73 buildings on…

Perhaps its the isolation (or the plunge to the water) of Heceta Head Lighthouse and its B&B that gives it an extra spooky feeling.

Spookiest Places in Oregon

THESE SEVEN HAUNTED VENUES WILL MAKE BELIEVERS OUT OF THE DIS-SPIRITED written by Jean Chen Smith | illustrations by Allison Bye Halloween is the ideal time to reconnect with your inner child. Remember sitting around the campfire, listening to ghost stories, and not being able to fall asleep because you were so scared? Or how about plotting your trick-or-treat route so you could maximize your treat bag? Even though the 31st of October is one day out of the entire year, some of us spend the whole month either decorating, planning a costume party or making a costume for our kiddos. Beyond the home, there are also a ton of events to check out. “Halloween is an iconic time to see unique sights in fall colors from the Coast to the Cascades,” said Kari Westlund, president and CEO of Travel Lane County. This year, if you are in the mood…

Meat and vegetables hang from a fire dome during Tournant’s recent Oregon Asado event near Dundee.

Tournant: Dreams on Fire

A couple’s foray into community building through ancient cooking techniques written by Joni Kabana photography by Aubrie LeGault During both of their childhoods, Mona Johnson and Jaret Foster spent a lot of time in the great outdoors growing and eating bountiful food choices. While a natural progression for both of them was ending up working in professional kitchens, they also both shared a dream of creating a more immersive dining experience. In 2009, the couple met and bonded over their love of food, farms, nature and community building while working at Portland Farmers Market, a nonprofit organization that organizes various farmers’ markets. They began to formulate a plan centering on a new way of cooking that would engage and inspire both themselves and their guests. Tournant, their open-fire cooking and events company, was born out of this shared vision. Tournant’s signature offering is an unparalleled outdoor dining experience using farm-to-fire…

Recreational opportunities abound in the Klamath area.

Klamath Basin Trip Planner

Boxes get checked with ziplines, world-class bird watching, the pristine Crater Lake and a destination resort written by James Sinks Boy, was I mistaken. Growing up in Klamath Falls, I’d routinely complain there was nothing to do. A teenager thing, sure, but sort of ridiculous in retrospect when—as an adult—you’re attempting to narrow lengthy lists of potential adventure ideas. Adrenaline-fueled bouncing on the Klamath River and soaring among treetops on ziplines. Golfing the state’s only Arnold Palmer-designed links. Paddling creeks and among otters. Exploring conflict-laden history. Disappearing into volcanic caves. Fishing on more than sixty lakes. Getting a people’s-eye view of migratory birds. And that doesn’t even count the region’s crown jewel: Crater Lake, where you can easily lose an entire day, and then some. Turns out, there’s almost too much to do. (Mom was right.) While officially a high desert at 4,200 feet, the Klamath Basin—straddling the Oregon-California border…

Hood River Cherry Company owner Katy Klein finds a quiet moment in her Rainier cherry grove.

The Cherry on Top

Spring’s vibrant pink buds produce succulent bites of summer heaven from Hood River written by Julie Lee | photography by Daniel Stark There is something that screams spring when pink buds burst in the sky on cherry trees: bold pink in color, breathtaking against a blue sky, announcing winter’s end. That was especially true this year after Oregon’s seemingly never-ending deluge. It’s a “blink-and-you’ll-miss-it” window in May, when cherry blossom loyalists will walk, hike and bike around Oregon to breathe in the beauty and abundance of cherry blossoms. There is even a Cherry Blossom Park in Portland, dedicated to nature’s wizardry. Sweet cherries originated in the region between the Black and Caspian Seas and derive their name from the Turkish town of Cerasus. Colonists brought cherries with them in the 1600s, and in 1847, a settler traveling from Iowa to Oregon brought nursery stock, which became the first cherry trees…

Linda English cycles past flowers along the Tidbits ride.

Three Gravel Tours to Do in Oregon This Summer

From multi-day challenges to shorter routes, gravel biking takes you beyond the known written by Jen Sotolongo Over the past decade or so, gravel riding has emerged as an alluring cycling discipline. The draw of riding along oft-traveled dirt roads through remote areas filled with towering trees and breathtaking landscapes entices riders seeking a quieter and mostly car-free alternative to pavement without the skills required for mountain biking. With more than 71,000 miles of unpaved roads throughout the state, Oregon stands out as a veritable haven for two-wheeled off-road adventure. Gravel bikes typically resemble road bikes, only accommodate wider tires and a more upright and longer frame for stability on the slippery gravel. Ranging from hard-packed dirt to more humbling steep climbs and descents over loose rock, beginners and advanced riders alike can find a suitable gravel ride that meets their skill level. From single-day grinds to multi-day backcountry tours,…

The outdoors are also a restorative meditation for dogs, as well as people.

Celebrate the Dog Days of Summer

FIVE OREGON DAY TRIPS TO TAKE WITH YOUR DOG written by Jean Chen Smith Summer is a great time for getting outside with your four-legged buddy. The state has a plethora of state parks and eleven national forests, all with their own ecosystems and wildlife, ripe for exploring. In urban areas such as Portland and Ashland, there are huge parcels of verdant land for hiking, trail running or throwing a Frisbee. When traveling with your dog, be mindful of the leash regulations specific to the area. Some places call for leashing your dog because of sensitive wildlife and plant life. Additionally, make sure to carry some doggie bags and leave no trace. Here are our five picks for a summer of fun—choose one or do them all. We have even given you an overnight option should you choose to make a weekend trip out of it. BEND Riverbend Park is…

TenZen Springs & Cabins features six contemporary cabins.

TenZen Springs & Cabins

written by Kerry Newberryphotography by TenZen Springs & Cabins Perched on a bluff that overlooks the serpentine Wind River, this all-season retreat is the perfect place to spend time soaking in nature. Home to six contemporary cabins and surrounded by expansive meadows and evergreen trees in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge, there’s a quiet solace and restorative spirit that prevails here. In part, that’s due to the prime attraction. All six private cabins have an open-air infinity tub along with a Japanese-inspired outdoor shower and deck. Sourced from an underground aquifer 3,000 feet below the Wind River, pure geothermal spring water continuously and sustainably flows through each cabin’s private tub—a reminder of how water is a balm. But a stay at TenZen also proves that less is more. Set on 100 acres in a minimalist setting, it’s easy to unplug. Open the French doors to the soaking room…