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Xiao Ye features standout dishes that change with the seasons.

Xiao Ye

written by Kerry Newberry Every dish at Xiao Ye is an ode to memories—from the mini masa madeleines that arrive perched on a bluff of whipped butter with a sprinkle of jalapeño powder to the savory seasonal toast (on a recent night the chewy slices of sourdough came topped with roasted acorn and kabocha squash and a tangle of fresh herbs). Even the name is steeped in nostalgia. When chef Louis Lin and his partner, Jolyn Chen, were recounting their most meaningful meals over the years, it wasn’t the fancy dinners that resonated most but the twilight dishes shared with family and friends. “I thought about the meals my dad and I had after a late night at work,” said Chen. In Mandarin, these dining moments are called xiao ye, which translates to midnight snack. “It’s always cozy and comforting, and it’s the kind of experience we want to give…

Come for the cerulean blue at the new Bar Rio.

Dining Hot Spots in Bend

written by Kerry Newberry After schussing down the nearby ski slopes, it’s time for a soul-stirring dinner. For this wintry scenario, Bend can’t be beat. Here’s the town’s latest hot spots for the ultimate après-ski feast. For a luxe night out, head to Dear Irene (926 NW Brooks St.; www.dearirenebend.com), beautifully bedecked in gold and jewel tones with a row of luminous chandeliers. Opened by chef Jonny Becklund and his wife, Irene, you’ll find sublime starters like arancini stuffed with Oregon Dungeness crab, an umami-packed grilled cheese with black truffle honey and prawn saganaki. At Bar Rio (915 NW Wall St.; www.barriobend.com), there’s a new concept from longtime restaurateurs Steven and Amy Draheim. In the redesigned bar space, you’ll find interiors in cerulean blue, contemporary pendants and Alhambra-inspired tiles. On the menu, there’s no shortage of festive tapas and cocktails from a zingy shrimp and mango ceviche to spicy chicken…

The fine craftsmanship of Perpetually Devastated played out in a 1968 Overlander.

Art and Craft in an Airstream

A couple creates one-of-a-kind Airstream interiors in Southern Oregon written by Melissa Dalton photography by Bethany Williams With a business name like Perpetually Devastated, Parker Bolden and Bethany Williams are used to explaining the meaning. “We are sensitive people and find the state of our world depressing sometimes,” said Williams. “People hate others just for being different. There’s environmental degradation, extractive capitalism, the list could go on and on. You could just be really sad. It’s all perpetually devastating. And yet, you have to find a way to make yourself happy, to make things just a little bit better if you can.” One of the ways that the two have done that is by renovating Airstream trailers alongside a talented crew at their shop in Southern Oregon. Each project starts with a trailer that has solid bones, which they use as a base to rebuild the interior from scratch, from…

Dining outdoors at Riverside.

Riverside

written by Kerry Newberry photography by Amy Robb When chef Mark DeResta talks about his restaurant kitchen, he describes it as a culinary incubator. For more than fifteen years, he’s leveraged his all-day dining program to bolster surrounding micro-farmers, makers and producers. “We want to help share their story,” said DeResta. Locals in the know beeline to this under-the-radar Hood River spot: Here you can catch sunsets from an outdoor terrace elegantly tiered above the Columbia River, not to mention spy ospreys swooping for fish. But what really sets this hotel restaurant apart is how it’s so deeply rooted to the surrounding community. On a recent morning, DeResta swapped tales with Rebbecah Winnier, a third-generation tribal fisher from the Yakama Nation, as she delivered glistening Chinook salmon she caught hours before from the Columbia River. Soon after, he mingled with other regulars swinging by with everything from organically grown mushrooms…

Hood River Cherry Company owner Katy Klein finds a quiet moment in her Rainier cherry grove.

The Cherry on Top

Spring’s vibrant pink buds produce succulent bites of summer heaven from Hood River written by Julie Lee | photography by Daniel Stark There is something that screams spring when pink buds burst in the sky on cherry trees: bold pink in color, breathtaking against a blue sky, announcing winter’s end. That was especially true this year after Oregon’s seemingly never-ending deluge. It’s a “blink-and-you’ll-miss-it” window in May, when cherry blossom loyalists will walk, hike and bike around Oregon to breathe in the beauty and abundance of cherry blossoms. There is even a Cherry Blossom Park in Portland, dedicated to nature’s wizardry. Sweet cherries originated in the region between the Black and Caspian Seas and derive their name from the Turkish town of Cerasus. Colonists brought cherries with them in the 1600s, and in 1847, a settler traveling from Iowa to Oregon brought nursery stock, which became the first cherry trees…

Kevin Maloney deftly draws you into a Quixote-like tale that begins in Beaverton.

Pilgrim Power

Humor and drama on the journey to find the meaning of life interview by Cathy Carroll “This is the story of a pilgrim named Kevin Maloney,” we learn in the prologue to the novel The Red-Headed Pilgrim, autobiographical fiction by Kevin Maloney. Our hero hails from Beaverton, “a suburb of Portland the way the Monkees are a suburb of the Beatles.” A twisted JV football drill sends him running for the forest, sparking an existential crisis. His parents line up a therapist who offers him a copy of Siddhartha, and his pilgrimage eventually ensues. Think On the Road meets Napoleon Dynamite in the latest from this Portland-based author. You’ve said that half of writing is skill and half from how you live your life. Can you elaborate? When I was younger, I used to be dazzled by fancy sentences in books. I still am, but as I’ve gotten older, I…

With a shellfish license, anyone can take to crabbing off of docks, such as this one in Bandon.

Catching Crustaceans

’Tis the season for Dungeness delicacy written by Julie Lee Internationally sought for its sweet flavor, Oregon Dungeness crab appeals to all, from foodies to newbies who want to wade a toe into eating seafood. Commercially harvested since the 1800s, Oregon is well known for Dungeness. The Dungeness crab fishery is Oregon’s most valuable “single species” fishery, and Oregon named the Dungeness crab the official state crustacean in 2009. The Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, fully funded by commercial crab fishermen, was established in 1977 to research, educate and promote the image of crab. Tim Novotny was recently named executive director of the commission. “We try to be good industry partners wherever we can,” said Novotny, “supporting our fishermen by inspiring ongoing dialogue with the academic community, keeping abreast of the issues facing our ocean resource, and driving research to help maintain a sustainable fishery. Our fishermen depend on us to…

The Oregon Truffle Festival, going on twenty years, brings pungency to savory and sweet dishes to great delight

Oregon Truffle Festival

written by Kerry Newberry One of the bright spots of a Northwest winter is the Oregon Truffle Festival. Where else can you romp through misty forests on a guided truffle foray, partake in lectures with renowned mycologists and indulge in exceptional wine and truffle dinners? For almost twenty years, fungi and foraging enthusiasts have flocked to this winter fête to celebrate the state’s native black and white truffles. The luxurious ingredient grows wild in Oregon and is prized around the world for the umami flavor it adds to dishes. Most often found flourishing beneath the roots of Douglas fir trees, the fragrant fungi play an exceptional game of hide and seek. One of the best ways to root out the heady mushrooms is with a truffle dog and the festival includes a popular two-day training for dog owners along with The Joriad North American Truffle Dog Competition, the only event…

The Oregon Dungeness crab melt. Just add Coltrane for spice.

The Best Things in Life

written by Thor Erickson photography by Tambi Lane I became enamored with crab as a child. About once a year, my dad would arrive home carrying a bucket overflowing with fresh Dungeness crabs and a baguette tucked under his arm. On these occasions, everyone would stop what they were doing and get busy performing their assigned tasks. Dad steamed the crabs. Mom made a salad and warmed the baguette. My sisters cut lemons, lined the dinner table with newspapers and found the crab crackers. I got to put on the record album. Dad would shout from our tiny bustling kitchen, “Anything by Cal Tjader or … Coltrane!” “Coltrane it is,” I would shout back. We would spend hours sitting around the table, picking and eating steamed crab from the shell, dipping it in hot butter and talking and laughing. Everyone’s smiling faces glistening with butter and satisfaction. It was at…