Live Oregon

Oregon wasabi

Oregon Wasabi?

Oregon-grown wasabi is a versatile and spicy option for your cooking written by Sophia McDonald Sushi aficionados, take note: That spicy, lime green paste next to your dragon roll may be called wasabi, but chances are it isn’t the real thing. Most of the time, it’s a combination of horseradish, powdered mustard and green food coloring.  Wasabi is native to Japan, but you can buy it closer to home than you might think. Oregon Coast Wasabi in Tillamook County is one of only three commercial growers in the United States. Co-founder and CEO Jennifer Bloeser quite by accident stumbled onto the relative of the horseradish plant at an equestrian event. A fellow participant had brought some plants to the gathering and was giving them away. Bloeser’s neighbors in Southeast Portland were always sharing the bounty from their gardens with her, and she was looking for something to give back. Wasabi,…

gin cocktail

Cocktail Card

Rosemary’s Bee Bee recipe courtesy of Hannah Loop at The Winchester Inn, Ashland •  2 ounces Hendrick’s Gin  • ¾ ounce fresh lemon juice  • ¾ ounce rosemary black peppercorn honey syrup  • Rosemary garnish FOR SYRUP​ •  tablespoons black peppercorns​ •  cup water​ •  cup honey​ • handful of fresh rosemary FOR COCKTAIL Combine and shake over ice, then double strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with rosemary. FOR SYRUP​ Toast black peppercorns, then add to saucepan with water and honey. Bring to a low simmer.  Add a small handful of fresh rosemary and let simmer for five minutes.  Remove from heat and steep for 20 minutes. Strain. 

Ultimate Oregon Road Trip

The Ultimate Oregon Road Trip

12 days, tons of sights Get ready for the drive of a lifetime written by Sheila G. Miller After being cooped up, hitting the open road can be invigorating.  The past few months have been a trying time for all of us. But there’s no balm like the outdoors to soothe anxiety and give us a renewed sense of self.  We spent some time trying to construct the ultimate Oregon road trip—that is, a twelve-day trip that takes you through the natural wonders of our state. From the dunes of the Oregon Coast to the jagged edges of the Wallowas, we tried to hit them all. For now, reopening our state to tourism is uncertain, so some of this may continue to be a pipe dream. But that doesn’t mean we can’t plan and dream—join us, won’t you? DAY 1 BEND Bend is in the center of the state, making for…

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Home Grown Chef, pasta

An easy homemade upgrade to your Marinara

1859’s Home Grown Chef Thor Erickson shares the secret to a gourmet alternative to marinara that you can easily do while in quarantine. Try Thor’s simple pasta all’Amatriciana!   Find more recipes from Thor that use local Oregon products here.    

Chanterelle Mushroom Compound Butte

Chanterelle Mushroom Compound Butter

Home Grown Chef Thor Erickson | photography by Charlotte Dupont Thud, thud, thud! The knock on the door reverberated as I took my first sip of morning coffee. It was around 7:30 a.m. on a damp October Sunday. At the door was my friend and colleague Julian Darwin. “Good morning, Chef!” he exclaimed with urgency. “Get your things, we’re going into the forest.” “What? Why?” I asked. “For chanterelles, of course!” he announced, his British accent elevating it to a proclamation. I put my coffee in a thermos, put on my boots and coat, and we were off. Julian, more than just a chef, has been a mentor to me in many ways. He introduced me to the world of teaching. Before that, our culinary paths crossed, and we’d worked together. European trained, he is an old-school chef with the same work ethic and ideology I learned during my early…

Yoga retreat

Don’t namaste put—get away to a rejuvenating yoga retreat

written by Cathy Carroll IN A DOME built into a hillside, a round skylight at its crown, Burdoin Mountain rising behind it and the Columbia River flowing in the foreground, the yoga session began. The poses unfolded easily for the participants, who’d spent the night steps away in a ring of cabins inspired by minimalist Japanese design, and the morning rotating between the sauna, the cold plunge pool, the warm saltwater soaking pool and the hot tub outside, gazing up at the Zen landscape—the Gorge veiled in mist. Yoga at the subterranean Sanctuary at The Society Hotel in Bingen, as with other retreats, just isn’t the same as hitting the nearby studio after work. Done anywhere, yoga can calm the spirit while strengthening the body, but retreats can amplify the experience as well as the benefits. This spring, yoga retreats throughout Washington offer varying themes, from hiking and uncovering your…

Cream of Chanterelle Mushroom Soup

The Magic of Mushrooms — Cream of Chanterelle Mushroom Soup & Chanterelle Mushroom, Brie + Hazelnut Toast

Cream of Chanterelle Mushroom Soup Nicoletta’s Table / LAKE OSWEGO Yields 8 cups  2 pounds fresh chanterelle mushrooms  2 tablespoons shallots, finely minced 1⁄4 cup onion, finely chopped 1⁄4 cup celery, finely chopped 2 tablespoons sweet butter 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped 1⁄4 cup dry sherry  4½ cups chicken stock (or vegetable stock)  2 cups heavy cream  2 teaspoons Kosher salt 1⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper Clean the mushrooms of any excess debris and pine needles by gently brushing the mushrooms using a vegetable brush or a clean soft cloth. Gently tear the mushrooms into 1⁄2-inch wide lengths. In a heavy-bottomed, 6- to 8-quart pot, melt the butter and add in the olive oil over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, shallots, onions, celery and thyme and stir occasionally until everything is wilted and soft, without allowing the vegetables to color. Turn up the heat…