Live Oregon

On a forest clearing outside of Tillamook, a couple creates its own Oil Can Henry’s architectural style.

A Cabin State of Mind

A photographer and an architect, friends and neighbors, craft a small retreat in the woods outside Tillamook written by Melissa Dalton photography by Shawn Records Both Shawn Records and his wife, Jenny, grew up in Idaho with a “mountain place” in their families. His grandparents had a little trailer at Lake Cascade, while Jenny’s parents built a cabin close to Lake Fork, ten miles south of McCall. Around 2013, the now Portland-based couple—he’s a photographer, and she’s a librarian—started looking for a little extra land of their own to continue the tradition and build a new place for a new generation of the family, said Records. They started scouting out the Oregon Coast, but contrary to so many buyers, didn’t necessarily want to be on the water. Then they found a seven-acre forested parcel outside Tillamook, with a meadow clearing, salmonberry thickets, and deer trails carved through groves of alder…

The Egg Drop’s Amy Engelhard.

Re-Nesting

The egg beats its way back into our homes written by Julie Lee Photography by The Egg Drop The egg is peeling back its bad reputation. Once frowned upon as a cholesterol calamity, to the contrary, eggs are one of the best sources of high-quality protein you can find. Rich in vitamins including B2, vitamins B12, D, and A, and a host of minerals, eggs are an essential part of a healthy diet. A bonus? They are low in calories. Shelling out pretty pennies for glowing skin? Try eating eggs instead. Eggs are great for skin; they soften, firm and hydrate all at once, with amino acids helping to generate new skin cells. Studies show that two major antioxidants in eggs, lutein and zeaxanthin, are known to increase protection against UV damage that leads to lines, age spots and cancer, as well as to reduce age-related macular degeneration. Eating one…

DIY Treehouse

DIY: Backyard Treehouse

Photography by Christopher Dibble The beginning of Grey Shaeffer’s treehouse adventure was as a child at her parents’ farm in Forest Grove. Her father built an A-frame treehouse that spanned two trees, and as an adult, Shaeffer made some updates to the original. “I was 19, and I didn’t want to move back into the house because I’d gone to school overseas, so I moved into the tree house,” recalled Shaeffer. “So, I actually remodeled that tree house and lived in it, with plumbing and everything.” Years later, as a designer and founder of Willa Work, Schaeffer was building an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) in her Portland backyard, and it was a natural decision to add a treehouse, using leftover building materials from the larger project. “I wanted a treehouse for me and my kids,” said Schaeffer, who fashioned hers into an office space, but also saw it get used…

A chance encounter in Italy led to this egg yolk and ricotta ravioli recipe.

Uovo the Top

written by Thor Erickson photography by Tambi Lane “What to cook for dinner?” I thought to myself as I arrived home after a long day. I knew my fridge was looking a bit sparse, and I was at a loss as to what to prepare. Walking into the house, I noticed a box on the front step. I opened it to find two dozen fresh eggs from our friend, Darren, who has twelve chickens that he refers to as “the girls.” The eggs were so fresh that they were still warm. I suddenly knew what was on the dinner menu. As I cracked the delicate brown shells on the edge of a cup, I noticed the intense orange of the yolks. Suddenly I was transported back in time to a meal I had at a small hilltop restaurant just outside the northern Italian town of Piacenza. Upon my arrival, I…

Field & Vine Events staff pour wine at a dinner held at Alloro Vineyard in Sherwood as Field & Vine founder, Pascal Chureau, welcomes attendees to the dinner with Alloro Vineyard owner, David Nemarnik.

Farm Dinners

written by Kerry Newberry photography by Bridgette Rusnac For local food enthusiasts, the hottest table of the year is the one that’s on a farm. Is there any better place to enjoy the abundance of sought-after berries, grilled corn on the cob and a gorgeous heirloom tomato salad? “We know our guests enjoy getting out of restaurant dining rooms on summer nights and eating close to the source,” said Pascal Chureau, founder of Field & Vine Events. “It’s also a fun way to discover new wineries and farms.” Chureau hosted his first farm dinner in 2013, initially as a one-off event to introduce patrons to the farmers who supply his West Linn restaurant Allium with produce. That wildly successful gathering spurred a new business venture and the chef now partners with farms and vineyards around the state, connecting the seasons through food and place. Some of his most popular spots…

Buoy Beer Company’s fifth vintage of Love, Lost at Sea barleywine is aged in Freeland Spirits bourbon barrels.

Keep Spring Beers Weird

written by Beau Eastes Having lived in the Pacific Northwest for more than 20 years, I’ve come to love and appreciate the craft beer calendar so many of our amazing breweries operate on. Summer brings out IPAs and all their goodness, fall is time for fresh hop experimentation, and winter is usually one glorious high ABV haze. But the spring, oh the spring is when things get wild and anything goes. It’s the seasonal equivalent of international waters or Malheur County. Here’s what we’re drinking while we’re embracing the shoulder season behind March and April. ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING FROM HAIR OF THE DOG: In February, craft beer pioneer Alan Sprints announced he’s shutting down Hair of the Dog, the iconic eastside Portland brewery he founded in 1993. Your favorite barrel-aged beer most likely owes a debt of gratitude to Sprints, who popularized the Old World beer-making technique at a time…

Wild Thing PDX serves up vegan-forward, plant-inspired bowls.

Wild Thing PDX

written by Kerry Newberry Like so many other diners with good intentions, you pledged to eat more vegetables this year. That’s easier to do with the recent addition of Wild Thing PDX to Portland’s Alberta Arts District. The first thing you need to know about this vegan-forward, plant-inspired bowl restaurant is that chef Sam Smith of Sweedeedee (and formerly Tusk) designed the core menu. “He’s such a wizard with vegetables,” said Kelsey Glasser, owner of wine bar Arden and the developer behind Wild Thing PDX. “Chefs can do amazing things with vegetables, but Sam really gives them the star treatment,” she added. Another talent currently leading the kitchen is Dominique Rodriguez, who worked at vegan hot spot Tiny Moreso and co-founded the vegetarian pop-up, Raiz. The signature bowls pop with satisfying flavors from The Wild One that layers ginger beets, urfa chili sweet potato, lemony brussel sprouts, crispy sumac cabbage…

Sibeiho’s Holly Ong and Pat Lau.

Sibeiho: Spice of Life

written by Kerry Newberry A few years ago, Holly Ong and Pat Lau cooked up one of their favorite childhood dishes: Singapore Chili Crab. But instead of traditional mud crabs for the signature seafood dish, they used freshly caught Oregon Dungeness crabs from Kelly’s Brighton Marina. “We are always looking to add flavors that remind us of our home using local ingredients,” said Ong. The sweetness of the crab played off their homemade spicy, tangy umami sauce in a way that delighted them both. “We thought maybe other people will want to try this too,” said Ong. In 2019, the longtime friends who met while working for Nike Singapore, began hosting private supper clubs. “It was a way to share family dishes from Singapore that we missed the most,” said Ong. Enter Covid in 2020, and the entrepreneurs shifted their focus from pop-up dinners to launching a food startup, beginning…

This interior space in Michael McCulloch’s pavilion brings together an absence of adornment and peaceful views of the outdoors.

DIY: Meditation Space

In 2006, Michael McCulloch completed a pool pavilion on the Portland property that the architect shares with partner, Maryellen Hockensmith. From the start, this wasn’t just any pool pavilion, as the site is an 80-acre working lavender farm that hosts a 1980 house designed by famed Oregon architect Pietro Belluschi. “We designed [the new pavilion] intentionally to be like a piece of the original building broken off and put out in the garden,” said McCulloch. The resulting structure is multi-functional, with two rooms that can be closed from one another and a bathroom in the middle. The front “expansive” section of the pavilion captures the site’s far-reaching views, as well as the nearby pool, while the rear “introspective” room has three walls composed of sliding glass doors that frame the natural crawl of the surrounding land. The entire building is constructed of Port Orford cedar, which was chosen “because it’s…