Food+Drink

Dining At Casa Zoraya

We are taking a look at Casa Zoraya, perfect Peruvian food classics written by Jen Stevenson | photos by Gwen Holle Buried in a trafficy, nondescript block of North Lombard just east of the interstate, this unexpected slice of Lima life is drawing Portland diners both curious and already besotted with its perfect Pisco sours, vibrant ceviches, and rich, robust Peruvian comfort food classics. Helmed by namesake and Andina alum Zoraya Zambrano, whose family originally emigrated from Calca, a town in Peru’s Sacred Valley of the Incas, and her children, Gloria and Gary Marmanillo (Andina, Paiche, Can Font, DOC), the color-splashed restaurant’s menu is short and sweet, no more than a dozen dishes melding local produce with traditional Peruvian ingredients like ají chile, lucuma fruit and choclo, a chewy, starchy, large-kerneled Andean corn. The beautifully executed—and plated—fare ranges from prismatic shrimp causas to an ultra-savory lomo saltado to chunks of…

Best Places for Cold Weather Comfort Food

Comfort food destinations KACHKA Portland food lovers waited with bated herring breath for beloved Siberian pelmeni purveyors Bonnie and Israel Morales to open their second, larger location, just up the way from their SE Grand Avenue firstborn (now renamed Kachinka). James Beard Award-nominated chef Bonnie Morales pulls from her Belarusian heritage to dish up fan favorites like Baltic Sprat Buterbrodi, Rabbit in a Clay Pot, and Herring “Under a Fur Coat,” while a new Russian-style mangal grill allows for a slew of charcoal-fired skewers—try the Azeri-style sturgeon, lamb lyulya and whole baby eggplant. The vodka menu remains reliably robust, but the new Kachka also boasts a wine cellar and a strong Eastern-European-centric bottle list. 960 SE 11TH AVE. PORTLAND www.kachkapdx.com SUGARPINE DRIVE-IN Those long hot summer nights of sipping frosé on the patio may be but a happy memory, but this charming Troutdale drive-in, opened in July by chef-owners Emily…

Foodie Destinations: We have your food vacations planned

Foodie destinations around the state written by Kevin Max, Sheila G. Miller & Jen Stevenson Maybe you’re like us―at breakfast on vacation, you’re already planning your next meal. Oregon is nearly 100,000 square miles, and there are bountiful crops and delightful restaurants in every corner. We picked some spots you’re going to want to check out—whether you’re looking for a down-home old-timey cafe, a fancy big-city feast, or a chance to improve your cooking chops. Portland’s Fine Dining Portlanders pride themselves on being as casual and unpretentious as they come, but that doesn’t mean they don’t know how to gussy up and have a night on the town, complete with white tablecloths, wine pairings and break-the-bank-worthy tasting menus. Plan on being early to your reservation at uber-talented chefs Will Preisch and Joel Stocks’ modernist gem Holdfast Dining, because it shares a wall and kitchen with star bartender Adam Robinson’s exceptional…

Po’Shines is Much More Than a Restaurant Venture

Po’Shines is Nourishing the Community’s Soul written by Adam Sawyer | photography by Claire Thorington Pastor E.D. Mondainé grew up on soul food. The St. Louis native can recall a time in his life when every member of the extended family excelled in one particular dish, taking pride in the way it filled bellies as well as hearts. “It was food created from the soul to feed the soul,” Mondainé said. Mondainé would grow into a man who extended the tradition and meaning of soul food into just about every aspect of his life. He also wears many hats. In addition to being a pastor, he’s an activist, author, musician and now president of the Portland NAACP. Long before taking his current position, Mondainé saw a trend and a need in his adopted home of Portland. “There were a number of community members on public assistance,” he said, “just as…

Bruce’s Candy Kitchen in Cannon Beach

Seaside Sweets in Cannon Beach at Bruce’s Candy Kitchen photography by Ben McBee It’s an age-old Oregon tradition—visit the coast, try the taffy. Bruce’s Candy Kitchen, which has locations in Seaside and Cannon Beach, has been serving up the sweet treat since 1963. From humble beginnings—eight taffy flavors and twelve hand-dipped chocolates—the candy store has expanded to offer hundreds of delicacies. Look for the pink-and-white striped storefront—Bruce’s family is waiting for you. Visitors are always encouraged to stop by and watch the taffy-making process, but Taylor suggests calling ahead to ensure it’s happening. Besides sweets, Bruce’s Candy Kitchen also sells a variety of baking accessories and toys. Learn more about Bruce’s Candy Kitchen.

Nordia House of Southwest Portland

Inside the Nordia House of Southwest Portland, a cultural center, showcasing all things Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish. written by Cathy Carroll | photography by Carly Diaz Chefs who strive to create the authentic cuisine of faraway places must frequently rely on what they’ve learned from family, travels and research. At Broder Söder, however, chef James Drinkward works in a microcosm inside the Nordia House of Southwest Portland, a cultural center which opened in 2015. Here, he’s merely a Thor’s hammer throw from experts on all things Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish. “The people at Nordia House are influential,” said Drinkward, who grew up in Southwest Portland. “I get lots of interesting feedback, such as, ‘My grandma made it this way.’ Scandinavians tend to be pretty direct, so they’ll tell you what they think.” Not your grandfather’s Sons of Norway lodge, Nordia House exemplifies contemporary Nordic design inspired…

Beerlandia: How to Cellar Beer That is Exceptional

Wondering how best to cellar beer? There are five simple rules to follow. written by Jeremy Storton | illustrated by Allison Bye As legend has it, British lords would age a batch of barley wine made when a baby was born, then drink it when the lad turned 18. These days, we know fresh is best, but there is still a time and place for something old and something brewed. Cellaring a beer has five simple rules. 1. Keep bottles upright to allow yeast to settle and to minimize surface area oxidation. 2. Keep bottles away from sun and fluorescent light, which will create off flavors reminiscent of skunk or propane. 3. Keep bottles at a steady, even temperature, around 50 degrees, to allow good flavors to evolve and harsh ones to mellow. 4. Stronger beers can store longer, but plan on saving the beer up to five years, unless advised…

Gastronomy: Wild About Game

Gastronomy: Wild About Game written by Jen Stevenson Run (and eat) wild with a thicketful of the Pacific Northwest’s best chefs at Nicky USA’s annual celebration of wild game and culinary camaraderie, returning on September 30 to the Mt. Hood Oregon Resort in Welches, Oregon. Now in its eighteenth year, the festival promises an impressive lineup of local cooking talent, from Castagna’s Justin Woodward and Aviary’s Sarah Pliner to Seattle chefs David Nichols (Rider) and Alex Barkley (Manolin). Against a backdrop of the Oregon high country’s brilliant fall foliage, guests sample gourmet meats, craft beers, charcuterie, spirits, cheeses, wine, cider, chocolate and coffee from nearly fifty top local purveyors including Olympia Provisions, Salt & Straw and Crowley Wines, plus meat-centric bites from more than a dozen acclaimed chefs like Gregory Gourdet of Departure and Kachka’s Bonnie Morales. The meaty merriment turns serious come the Carter Cutlery Cooking Competition, which pits…

Best Places for Fall Foraging

Best Places for Fall Foraging around the state written by Jen Stevenson Oregon autumns are our favorite so we’ve rounded up our top three fall foraging destinations for you to put on your to-try list. SOKOL BLOSSER Not just a pretty patio for sipping and soaking in valley views, the Sokol Blosser family’s esteemed Dundee Hills winery is home to one of the finest kitchens in the Willamette Valley. When executive chef Henry Kibit isn’t dishing up savory parsley root custard topped with salmon roe and licorice fern and slabs of tender brisket over fried wild nettles, he’s roaming the miner’s lettuce and morel-strewn hills behind the vineyard, collecting seasonal treasures to incorporate into the six-course Farm & Forage wine pairing luncheons he serves in an intimate, sun-splashed space behind the tasting room. 5000 NE SOKOL BLOSSER LN. DAYTON sokolblosser.com RACK & CLOTH Exit I-84 onto the Historic Columbia River…

Oregon Kiwis Do Exist and So Does The Kiwitini

Before I talk about Oregon kiwis, I need to be completely honest. written by Thor Erickson | photos by Megan Morse When the editors of 1859 Oregon’s Magazine proposed that I write about kiwis, I thought they had lost their minds. Kiwis? In Oregon? Really? I went home and binge-watched “Flight of the Conchords” while I did some research. After a healthy dose of Bret and Jemaine, I soon found that kiwis do grow in Oregon, and are becoming quite popular. Kiwi berries (also known as hardy kiwi, grape kiwi or cocktail kiwi) are smooth-skinned and much smaller in size than their furry cousins from New Zealand. I drove out to Dundee to HB&K farms to pick a few for myself. The strawberry-sized kiwi berries, or Actinidia arguta, are not genetically modified minis, but their own perennial vine, native to Japan, China and Russia. Kiwi berries have a short growing season,…