Think Oregon

Argonaut bikes are made with sealed resin and pressurized carbon for a sleek, stable ride.

Argonaut Cycles—Wheels of Fortune

Argonaut Cycles drives a carbon manufacturing and aesthetic revolution Written by Kevin Max The Argonaut Cycles bike manufacturing space in Bend may seem like many other modern maker spaces in Oregon—a stylish small array of furniture, an espresso machine, the latest craft Pilsner from a local brewer and a large screen TV to watch the Tour de France and other cycling events. Then there’s the Argonaut bike that, while motionless on a stand, feels like speed interrupted. Its lithe carbon frame has an appearance so clean and smooth that it feels as if no manufacturing process was involved in its creation. Indeed, none of this was accidental. “I wanted more control over the material and more ability to differentiate,” said Argonaut founder and owner Ben Farver. When he first started making bikes in Portland in 2007, Farver was working with steel frames and what he describes as a lot of…

Parks and gardens proposed for the riverbank.

Albina Rising

After bulldozers, highways and development brought down Portland’s historic cultural hub of the Black community, an innovative path forward emerges Written by Fiona Max On a Friday evening in the ’60s, locals of Northeast Portland’s Albina district could be found in the Hill Block building, an iconic, domed building on the corner of Williams and Russell Street. At the time, the place was home to the Cotton Club, a jazz club which had quickly gained popularity under owner Paul Knauls. Knauls had worked his way into the scene in Spokane, Washington, at the Davenport Hotel, and had gone to Portland in search of a venue of his own. He bought the rundown Cotton Club in 1963, and brought it back to life. Its fall, Knauls said, would come in 1968, after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., as tensions between the Black and white community ran high. “People came…

Kate Fitzpatrick, the new executive director of Deschutes River Conservancy, thinks big.

Water Wisdom

How the Deschutes River Conservancy aims to bridge the divide among water users Interview by Kevin Max Whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting. At the Deschutes River Conservancy in Central Oregon, they’re taking the fight out of water. The new executive director, Kate Fitzpatrick, is a veteran of the organization and skillful ambassador among the widely divergent stakeholders of water management and marketing. We caught up with her just after the river conservancy received federal funds for new projects. What are the different water interests you’re balancing on a daily basis? We are balancing water demands for healthy river flows, irrigated agriculture and growing urban communities. The lion’s share of water in the Deschutes Basin (86 percent) is allocated in the form of water rights that are diverted from the river to support irrigated agriculture. The challenge is to restore more natural flows to the river while…

Devices reaching higher altitude winds produce up to four times the electricity of a small wind turbine.

Airborne Wind Energy Startup Takes Flight

Revolutionizing the kite-string-to-power idea not seen since the days of Ben Franklin Written by Kevin Max Bence Oliver had plenty of experience with renewable energy, even wind energy, but it was a coffee in Portland with eWind founder David Schaefer that put wind under his wings. Oliver had just resigned from his post as the chief financial officer at Windlift, a Raleigh, North Carolina-based airborne wind energy company, when he returned to Portland, where he’d lived before. Before Windlift, Oliver had spent five years with eBay, as its director of strategic sourcing in Switzerland. “Prior to my arrival at eWind, I was really impressed with how much they were able to do with relatively little money,” he said. “In a relatively short amount of time, they were able to put together a system that is fully functional, it flies, and it generates electricity.” Airborne wind energy is a system that uses…

The Grove Market Hall has nine food and beverage purveyors in NorthWest Crossing, Bend.

Hallowed Halls

New food halls offer flexibility and eclectic cuisine for a casual approach to dining out Written by Cathy Carroll Dining out is back again and a few new food halls are keeping it interesting, casual and flexible. In Portland, Collective Oregon Eateries, or CORE, is on a mission to elevate the work environment for culinary artists and the eatery experience. It has its sights set on being “the ultimate foodie destination,” according to its vision statement for the 36,000-square-foot space on SE 82nd Avenue. The offerings include Papi Sal’s Puerto Rican barbecue meets Philadelphia comfort food; Mitate sushi; Matta’s Vietnamese dishes, A UnicornCreationz Restaurant’s Mexican-Southern fusion; Gumba Pasta Parlor and EEM’s Thai barbecue. In Beaverton, 1st Street Dining Commons, a pandemic pop-up, prevails. The space offers tents around tables for enjoying takeout from surrounding downtown restaurants such as Koya Sushi, Ex Novo Brewing, Big’s Chicken, Top Burmese Bistro Royale, Nak Won…

Black Futures Farm co-owners Malcolm Hoover, left, and Mirabai Collins.

Of Fermentation and Equity

Brew Dr. writes a new prescription—uplifting Black farmers with their new yerba mate Written by Charles Rigby MATT THOMAS WAS a student at University of Oregon in 2002 when he became mystified with not being able to get good tea in coffee shops. He wrote a business plan to address this problem. “If you wanted tea in a coffee shop you had few options,” said Thomas. “I fell in love with tea in the process of writing the biz plan.” After graduating from UO in 2002, Thomas waded through uninspiring jobs before he returned to his business plan and raised $45,000 from friends and family for the first Townshend’s Tea Company teahouse in Portland. “For a long time I was unsure whether I could live off of tips,” he recalled. It wasn’t until 2007, when he was able to get out from behind the counter and focus on opening a second…

Breezy Anderson

Wonder Weld

Twisted steel and figurative appeal from a scrappy, self-taught sculptor Written by Kevin Max Breezy Anderson is a metal sculptor who turned a two-car garage in Bend into her workshop, where she began to learn the processes with “junkyard art.” She made mistakes along the way, but learned from them. Now she creates stunning works of beauty and pain sold around the world. Her metalwork began ten years ago when a family friend gave her an old welder and she was “instantly hooked.” Now her workspace includes a crane, a forge, multiple welders and, depending on her next piece, copper, steel, brass or aluminum. “Being a full-time sculptor hasn’t always been easy,” Anderson said. “A lot of the work would never have happened if I or others weren’t willing to try and accept the failures. The failures are where some of the largest successes come from.” “My style is a balance…

Art of wellness

The Art of Wellness

Forging new pathways to brain health by engaging in the creative art community Written by Cathy Carrol A musician lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging device with a keyboard and noise-cancelling headphones and plays a piece of music, then improvises, then composes. The imaging shows unexpected parts of the artist’s brain engaging. A cancer patient takes a doctor’s prescription to draw something—anything—every day. An ensemble performs authentic Japanese taiko drums and traditional dance as a way of combating violence against Asian Americans. Families at a birthing center see art depicting people who look like them, helping put them at ease and recover faster. Research and new technology continues to show the link between the arts and wellness, and Oregon health and civic organizations are embracing ways for it to make a difference in people’s lives. At Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, neuroscientist Lawrence Sherman began a series of popular…

Faultland by Suzy Vitello cover

Siblings, Shaken

Portland novelist Suzy Vitello imagines the “big one” and a family united by survival Interview by Cathy Caroll The “big one,” the earthquake which scientists predict could strike the Northwest at any moment, is what Suzy Vitello leverages in her new novel, Faultland, which follows three siblings working together to survive disaster in Portland. If resources don’t run out, if sickness doesn’t overtake them, if alt-right militias don’t converge and if the wet mass of land speeding toward their childhood home and makeshift shelter doesn’t bury them, they’ll have to navigate past traumas and the mistakes of their parents to survive as a family. Literary figures praising the book include Portlander Lidia Yuknavitch, author of the nationally acclaimed and bestselling novel The Book of Joan. She said Faultland “is about our collective resilience and the loyalty that holds us all together in the end.” Oregonians will no doubt savor this…