A Portland interior designer undertakes a difficult mission—modernizing a classic cabin.

How to Decorate a Log Cabin

A Portland interior designer crafts a delightful, rustic-meets-modern retreat in Black Butte Ranch written by Melissa Dalton | photography by Kayla McKenzie When interior designer Wendy Scott bought this log home in Black Butte Ranch, the sale included not just the house, but everything inside it. “You name it, we inherited it,” said Scott. “Forks, cups, art, baskets of dusty fake ivy upon baskets of dusty fake ivy, log beds, phones from 1980, linens that were thirty years old, and games with missing pieces.” As one of the oldest, most traditional forms of American architecture, log cabins are storied enough without all the additional stuff. This one, built in 1990, is a more contemporary version, but still came with the design problems unique to its typology. For Scott, deciding what to keep or toss was the first of many issues to tackle. Add to that, the fact that the thick…

A late Geminid meteor and fireworks illuminate dense fog right before the clock struck midnight on New Year’s Eve at Goldendale Observatory.

Goldendale Observatory

From cuisine to art to the starlit sky, things are looking up in Goldendale written by James Sinks Above the Columbia River in Central Washington—past a patchwork of vineyards, sentries of spinning windmills and the weathered farming community of Goldendale—the universe is waiting. In a cavernous dome and with a whir, a refrigerator-sized telescope with a 24.5-inch-diameter lens pivots and focuses, bringing into view distant celestial celebrities like star clusters, planets, galaxies and nebulae. The reflector-style scope is the star attraction—well, along with the stars—at Goldendale Observatory State Park, which invites visitors to climb a ladder for a peek during two free shows, several days a week, on a hilltop overlooking the city. Afternoon sessions are all about the sun, and offer views of the fiery surface that you’re not able to see anyplace else. “No one else does it like we do,” said Troy Carpenter, the observatory director and…

Your Guide to Summer Music Festivals

Soak in the sun and sounds of live music at these ten events around Oregon written by Ben Salmon | illustration by Ni Ma There’s no shortage of fun things to do in Oregon during the summer, and that includes music festivals, which give folks from Portland to Pendleton and points in between a chance to gather under the sun and enjoy a whole bunch of live music. Here are ten fests happening across the state that deserve a spot on your calendar this summer. ROOTS-ROCKIN’ Big Ponderoo This is year two for Big Ponderoo, a new event from the team behind one of Oregon’s great musical gatherings, the Sisters Folk Festival. Well-organized and expertly curated, Big Ponderoo features two days of Americana, folk-rock, rootsy soul and more in an easygoing atmosphere. At a time when too many festivals feel increasingly corporate (and expensive), Big Ponderoo is a throwback to…

Not merely wonderful dairy, the Tillamook Coast has some of the most scenic hikes on the Oregon Coast.

Tillamook Coast

This coastal region is a watery, culinary, cheesy—and collaborative—wonderland written by James Sinks | photography by Tillamook Coast Visitors Association Prior to statehood, there was no easy overland route to Tillamook Bay. So, before refrigeration was a thing, settlers had to rely on faster seafaring shippers to transport dairy and farm products to market in more populous Astoria and Portland. Thus, when traders said in the 1850s they’d no longer make the treacherous trek into the bay, it could have been disastrous. Cranky and motivated, the community came together and built its own boat, milling local lumber and scrounging metal and sails from nearby shipwrecks. Local tribal members even aided in the construction of what became the state’s first christened ship, and the Morning Star of Tillamook made its maiden voyage in 1855. It stands as an example of an apt oxymoron—independent cooperation—that still defines the Tillamook Coast. In 1909,…

Views from Paulina Peak on a hike in Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

An Ancient Playground

Central Oregon’s Newberry National Volcanic Monument is home to lava tubes and ersatz moon walks written by Joni Kabanaphotography by Rich Bacon/Visit Bend Get your lanterns out—you’re going to need them. Lava River Cave, Oregon’s longest uncollapsed lava tube, can be found approximately 13 miles south of Bend but feels like it is located in an ancient undiscovered land. This cave is in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which includes 54,822 acres of lava flows, lakes and geologic wonders. Visitors can also explore destinations such as Lava Butte, Lava Cast Forest and Newberry Caldera in addition to Lava River Cave. If you like reflecting about your life’s journey while setting your eyes on expansive vistas, you can drive (during summer months only) along rough terrain and hairpin turns to reach Paulina Peak at 7,984 feet, where views of the Oregon Cascades and high desert plains will leave you breathless. Take…

The Stephanie Inn at sunset and overlooking Haystack Rock.

Stephanie Inn

written by Kerry Newberry When the iconic Stephanie Inn opened thirty years ago, the vision was to create the ultimate beach house, a retreat that felt like the luxurious yet comfortable home of a good friend (a friend that has the design aesthetic of filmmaker Nancy Meyers). Let’s say mission accomplished and more. Especially with the recent renovation that enhanced the already resplendent inn. As part of the remodel, you’ll find an expansive collection of commissioned artwork from coastal artists throughout the property. On rainy days, take advantage of the guided art tours—schedule the walk around afternoon happy hour and you can learn about local legends like painter Jeffrey Hull while sipping a flute of rosé bubbles from the Willamette Valley. Other new additions for guests include seasonal experiences from sunrise yoga to guided tidepool adventures, farm-to-bar mixology class and culinary outings with executive chef Aaron Bedard that range from…

The beautiful, ancient monoliths at Cannon Beach make for a picturesque evening.

An Oregon Wellness Quest

7 DESTINATIONS TO REBOOT & RECHARGE THIS SPRING written by Jean Chen Smith As the days start to get longer and temperatures increase, we find the early promise of spring in all its splendid glory—the lush trees, the vibrant yellows of daffodils and emerging green grass. Shedding our heavy layers of jackets, sweaters and boots, along with the primal instinct for hibernation, I know I’m ready to get out and travel. This time of year is my favorite for seeking wellness experiences. Health and well-being can look different for everyone, ranging from spa retreats to meditation gatherings. Why not take this year to redefine what it means to be whole and healthy? Try something new instead of taking the same type of journey year after year. I know for myself, new adventures are a great way to stimulate my senses and knock me out of the ordinary. Here is a…

The Oregon Coast is a beautiful and challenging setting for surfing.

Surf’s Up!

The best places to ride waves on the Oregon Coast written by Jen Sotolongo Often overshadowed by more famous surfing destinations with warmer temperatures and palm trees, Oregon’s rugged coastline holds a secret for those seeking untamed waves and a unique surfing experience. Shaped by Pacific swells and surrounded by breathtaking landscapes, Oregon’s surf scene is both challenging and rewarding for beginners and experts alike. The allure lies not only in the waves but in the sense of discovery as you navigate lesser-known surf spots alongside charming coastal towns. Manzanita Nestled between the mountains and the ocean, Manzanita is a popular surf spot located a little more than an hour from Portland. Known for its mellow waves, the main beach in town is an ideal spot for beginner surfers, while nearby Short Sand Beach in Oswald West State Park caters to intermediate riders. Post-surf, visitors can explore the laid-back Manzanita…

Fossils found at the Wheeler High School fossil beds in Fossil.

Digging for Fossils

Fossil, Oregon, lives up to its name written by Joni Kabana Are you an explorer? Would you like to dig for fossils in a place that is relatively unknown? Then head to the tiny town of Fossil in the land where time forgot. Here you can find fossils in a hillside formed some 30 million years ago by volcanic activity. What was once a lush region with lakes and waterways is now a paradise for rock hounds and fossil lovers. Diggers have found more than thirty different species of plants, insects and fish, some designated as being extinct. No excavation experience is necessary—just bring some patience and a rock pick, trowel and chisel. If you don’t happen to have these on hand, you can borrow equipment on site. This fossil bed was discovered during the building of Wheeler High School in 1949 when builders noticed a large amount of fossilized…