Recipes

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Feel-Good Blueberry Smoothie

I can admit it. I survived the holidays thanks (in part) to a little beverage we call coffee. I went from my normal one cup per day, to two, even three cups a day in order to get it all done. And I did, for the most part, get it all done.
Here I sit at the first of the New Year, and all of that “hurry-up and get it done” busyness of the holidays has disappeared—leaving a handful of spare time in its wake. I’m also left re-evaluating the need for 3 cups of coffee a day. I love the ritual of it—the warm mug cradled in my hands, the rich smell of the dark liquid mixed with a little cream, and the desire it instills in me to curl up on the couch and read.
But, there are times when I am reminded of some advice I was once given, “When you really pay attention, how does your body actually feel when you drink that beverage or eat that food?”
Honestly, I can say that anything past one small cup of coffee doesn’t actually feel that great. My stomach isn’t thrilled with the extra acid and my already ramped up Type-A body could do without the extra adrenaline. That’s not to say that I will give up coffee. No, I love the ritual too much, but after the excessive indulging of the holidays, I feel inclined to be kind to my body.
Occasionally, I whip up a smoothie that never fails to make my body feel energized. The ritual isn’t the same as coffee. There’s a list of ingredients. There’s the noise from the blender. There’s the fact that the beverage is cold and I loathe being cold. But, my body loves it. I can actually feel my mind sending out little messages of elation to the far extremities of my body as I drink down the grape purple concoction.
I’m not sure why I don’t make it more often. Perhaps it comes down to the choice between cleaning the coffee pot and cleaning the blender, and I choose coffee pot. Whatever it is, I plan to use a bit of my newfound time to make my energizing smoothie more often.

 
Feel Good Blueberry Smoothie
My kids love this smoothie. They have no idea there’s a handful of spinach in there. Hopefully, they won’t read this.
Ingredients:
1 cup orange juice
1 banana, broken into chunks
a handful of spinach, approx. 1 cup
¼ cup plain or Greek yogurt (optional)
1 tbsp honey
a shake of cinnamon
1 ½ cups frozen blueberries
1 cup ice
Put the ingredients into your blender in the order listed above. Blend until smooth. Pour into 2 large glasses or 4 small ones. Drop in a straw. Drink and be energized!

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Appetizer Recipes

Try these sidedishes from Oregon chefs Leather Storrs and Heidi Tunnell. 

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Mâche Salad with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

Noble Rot Portland Chef Leather Storrs Mâche Salad with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Makes 8 servings Mâche is an underappreciated early spring green. Its dark green, glossy round leaves grow in clusters. Mâche has a tender, velvety texture and a clean, chlorophyll-like flavor that is vaguely nutty. The real take-away is the dressing. My formula for vinaigrette is infinitely mutable and should discourage you from buying commercial dressing. Make too much, shake it in a jar and keep it in the fridge. Total time: 20 minutes Indgredients 1 ping pong ball-sized shallot, minced 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon orange juice 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 4 tablespoons olive oil 4 tablespoons hazelnut oil 8 cups mâche Directions Put all wet ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake it into submission. Season lightly with salt and pepper, and adjust acid and oil ratios to your palate. Toss the mâche gently with a little…

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Sauce Maltaise (Blood Orange Hollandaise) Recipe

Noble Rot Portland Chef Leather Storrs Sauce Maltaise (Blood Orange Hollandaise) Makes 8 servings This is a classic hollandaise sauce flavored with blood oranges and served on fat asparagus. Hollandaise is a bit of a bugaboo and intimidating for a good reason. It is a delicate emulsion (that is to say a suspension of oil in water) of butter, reduced vinegar and citrus, that is stabilized with egg yolks. Hollandaise likes to “break.” With very little coaxing, the emulsion separates and you’ve got yellow grease with gobs of egg yolk in it. Total time: 45 minutes Indgredients 3 egg yolks 4 blood oranges 1/2 cup rice vinegar 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 pound butter 2 tablespoons of Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon Bob’s Red Mill xanthan gum Directions Zest 4 blood oranges. Boil two pots of water. Pour hot water from one pot into your blender to warm it up. In hot…

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Black Pepper Beef on Hazelnut and Blue Cheese Cracker

Heidi Tunnell Catering Cresswell | heiditunnellcatering.com Chef Heidi Tunnell Black Pepper Beef on Hazelnut and Blue Cheese Cracker Makes 100 crackers These little crackers are great just for snacking on or for use with a cheese platter. Crackers are a chef’s best friend and something I recommend to home cooks to make and keep on hand in their freezer. You never know when that unexpected guest is going to stop by and it makes for a unique appetizer. Total time: 90 minutes Ingredients 1 stick (4 ounces) butter, softened 1/2 pound Rogue blue cheese 1 1/3 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 1/4 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup finely chopped hazelnuts Directions Cream butter and cheese together. Add flour, salt and pepper, scraping down the sides as needed to fully incorporate. Add your finely chopped nuts at the end. (Make sure these are finely chopped or…

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Ten No-Cook Impromptu Appetizer Ideas for the Holidays

Your halls are decked. You have a good start on your shopping. It’s the “drop by” guests that have you worried. During the holidays, when friends are more likely to stop by spur of the moment, is also when we are most strapped for time. So, what do you serve these impromptu guests when your prep time is limited?

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Meal Planning: A Holiday Stress Reliever

With the holidays upon us, our evenings grow a little busier and the time for cooking dinner can feel scarce. During times such as these, meal planning is especially beneficial. Meal planning is a time-saver, a stress reducer and it prevents me from unnecessarily buying or wasting a lot food.
I try to have my weekly meal plan written out by Sunday night. I decide how much time I have for cooking each evening, taking into consideration the activities going on during that specific week. Using the plan, I can then write out my grocery list.
Some weeks I’m organized enough to write out my meal plan in my planner. Other weeks it gets written down on the back of my grocery list while I’m at the grocery store. Some weeks the meal plan shows up on multiple Post-It notes that I stick on the fridge.
I don’t stress about the method, just that dinner ideas for the following week get written down somehow-someway.
To help myself out even further, I came up with themes for each day. When I’m stuck on what to plan out or I’m at the grocery store frantically trying to come up with ideas, I think of my themes and let them guide me toward a decision.
THEMES OF THE WEEK:
Meat{less} Monday: Could be a vegetarian meal or a roast chicken depending on my mood.
Taco, Thai or Tuscan Tuesday: Doesn’t have to be those specific types of food, but the idea is to choose a more ethnic dish to make.
In-the-Water Wednesday: A meal with seafood.
Throw It On the Table Thursday: Leftover night. I go through the fridge and throw on the counter any random bits of food that need to get eaten.
Family Friday Pizza Night: My night off from cooking. Pizza delivery.
Spontaneous Saturday: Maybe I found something at the Farmers Market that morning that I want to cook up. Or I want to try a new recipe. Or we want to go out.
Soup on Sunday: Just what is says.
Don’t overthink it. Simply make it a weekly habit to write down a dinner idea for each day. When the question, “What’s for dinner?” comes up … you’ll have an answer.

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Olive Oil recipes

Try these recipes with some delicious Oregon olive oil.