Categories: Food+Drink

Gluten-Free Brews Made in Oregon

written by Bronte Dod | photo courtesy of Omission


As gluten-free options carve out their own aisles at grocery stores, Oregon breweries are offering gluten-free beers. Some are available in bottles, while others are sold exclusively on tap. Here are four breweries that are joining the gluten-free movement.

Omission

If there is a mainstay gluten-free beer, this is it. Omission beer doesn’t start out gluten-free, as it is made with barley, but the gluten is later removed using an enzyme. Using traditional beer ingredients, and then backtracking, keeps the beloved flavor of true beer. The aptly named bottled beer comes in three styles (IPA, pale, lager), and is brewed by the Craft Brew Alliance in Portland—the first company to use this process in the United States.

Ground Breaker Brewing

Unlike the process used by Omission, Ground Breaker’s process is gluten free from the beginning. The Portland brewery (formally known as Harvester) uses naturally gluten-free ingredients such as chestnuts and lentils to brew nontraditional beers in a completely gluten-free facility. In 2012, Ground Breaker opened a pub with a gluten-free menu. Ground Breaker offers four year-round beers and a large variety of rotating seasonal beers, experimenting with the likes of rose hips, coffee and squash.

Deschutes Brewery

While not dedicated to an entire series of gluten-free beer (Craft Brew Alliance) or devoted exclusively to it (Ground Breaker), Deschutes has had a gluten-free beer on tap since 2008 at their pubs in Bend and Portland. They started with a golden ale and have recently launched a Northwest pale ale.

Bierly Brewing

Most recently, Eats & Treats—an entirely gluten-free restaurant in Philomath (near Corvallis)—has started brewing gluten-free beer on site. The brewer, John Paul Bierly, will brew the beer to drink exclusively in the restaurant, and expand to other gluten-free restaurants as production increases. This beer will be gluten free through-and-through, avoiding barley and using sorghum, rice and millet instead. The first batch will be revealed on March 17.

Share
Published by
admin
Tags: beer

Recent Posts

A mother-daughter duo writes a YA novel set on the Oregon Coast

interview by Sheila Miller Kim Cooper Findling and her daughter, 14-year-old Libby Findling, seem to have pulled off a near-impossible…

3 weeks ago

An architect and interior designer fashion a modern Tetherow home befitting the high desert

written by Melissa Dalton In this house, the formality of a traditional enclosed entryway is a thing of the past.…

1 month ago

Summit Arts Center’s creativity stems from a desire to preserve history in Government Camp

written by Catie Joyce-Bulay photography by Daniel Stark Most people head to Mount Hood for the epic skiing and hiking,…

1 month ago

A solar apiary combines solar power and pollination

written by James Sinks Honeybees dance and dip among the lightly shaded wildflowers in this patch of Rogue Valley farmland,…

1 month ago

New Oregon Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Nataki Garrett seeks to broaden marketing and season

What I'm Workin On interview by Sheila G. Miller The Oregon Shakespeare Festival announced earlier this year that its new…

1 month ago

My Workspace — Blue Mountain Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center

Rehabilitating wildlife is a way of life for this former vet tech written by Catie Joyce-Bulay photography by Joni Kabana…

1 month ago