Think Oregon

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-nike-oregon-project-alberto-salazar-rupp-farah-olympic-games-london-10k

Nike’s Oregon Project

History was in the making in the London chill, but it wouldn’t include the usual favorites.

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-business-profile-carbon-audio-jason-martin-with-zooka-speakers

Amplify with Style

Portland’s Carbon Audio wants to make your device ‘louderer.’

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-willamette-valley-oregon-from-where-i-stand-gaston-ken-bilderback-ambulance-fire-station

From Where I Stand: Gaston

1859’s From Where I Stand feature heads to Gaston, a small hamlet 30 miles outside of Portland.

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-thirteen-oregon-creatives-crochet-tryptich

Oregon’s Creative Impact

1859 sits down with Oregon’s most creative and innovative thinkers and doers.

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-willamette-valley-oregon-creative-alan-scholz-bike-builder

Alan Scholz: Portable bike builder

A self-described serial entrepreneur, Alan Scholz has built his life and businesses around his love affair with bicycles. CEO of Green Gear Cycling and maker of Bike Friday in Eugene, Scholz has converted his passion into dozens of innovations for cyclists worldwide. “I’m out on a ride, going 40 mph downhill, and I’m thinking of how to design a bike so others can experience the thrill,” he says. Scholz, 61, opened his first bike shop at age 17 in the garage of his parent’s North Dakota home. At 19, he borrowed his mother’s sewing machine and stitched together a carrying bag that would fit on his bike. He peddled the resulting product, the Burley Bike Bag, at the Eugene Saturday Market as a young father, but had difficulty getting his infant daughter there safely on his bicycle. So he invented a safe and durable child trailer—the Burley Lite. The success…

2013-march-april-1859-magazine-portland-thirteen-oregon-creatives-aurelie-tu-designer-crafted-systems

Aurelie Tu: Designer

Designer Aurelie Tu hitches the world together with artworks in felt. When concert cellist Aurelie Tu developed tendonitis from her first profession, she got crafty in her second set. The musician who once toured with the opening act for Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, and played with Portland’s Pink Martini, channeled her training in industrial design. In 2010, she founded CraftedSystems, a startup through which she designs art from woolen felt. “My goal is to make something structural without a framework—a design challenge,” says Tu, 34. “I like experimenting with different geometric shapes in that process.” The design of her Southwest Portland home is itself a portrait of style—a chair shaped like a giant vertebra, a low-slung commode, interlocking felt pieces sparingly throughout. Tu grew up in Calgary, her father a mathematical economics professor, and her mother blazing trails in the oil and gas industry. She began playing cello at…