Business

oregon-addy-awards-1859-best-publication-design-2012

1859 Oregon’s Magazine Takes First Oregon ADDY; Finalist for Maggie

BEND, Oregon—In one memorable weekend, 1859 Oregon’s Magazine (1859magazine.com), a statewide lifestyle magazine, won the 2012 Oregon ADDY Award for Best Oregon Publication Design and was a finalist for the prestigious Western Publishing Association’s (WPA) Maggie award for Best Consumer Quarterly.
The inaugural year of the ADDDYs took place at Sunriver Resort March 17. The 2012 Maggie Award winnerswill be announced during the 61st annual Maggie Awards Banquet on April 27th in Los Angeles. 1859 Oregon’sMagazine was also a Maggie finalist for Best Quarterly in 2011.
“We’re grateful to these esteemed awards organizations for recognizing the effort that the 1859 crew puts intoevery issue,” says Heather Johnson, 1859 publisher. “We thank our designers, in particular, for their gift andfor this ADDY award. We are about to open a new chapter, with bimonthly publication, and are confident in ourcreative team to continue that level of excellence.”
1859 Oregon’s Magazine, the icon for Oregon lovers, will build on its continued growth over the past three years,increasing its publication frequency to six issues a year, beginning with the July-August issue. 1859 readers canexpect the same quality they have become accustomed to but with an upgrade in quantity.
“We’ve now reached an exciting point where consumer acceptance of 1859 and market demand have created theperfect environment for us to increase our frequency and deepen our relationships with partners,” says Johnson.
Since its inception in 2009, 1859 has gone from a quarterly magazine created by two people to a cross-platformmedia icon sold in seven states with 12 employees located throughout Oregon.
About 1859 Oregon’s Magazine
1859 Oregon’s Magazine is a statewide lifestyle magazine named for Oregon’s year of statehood. 1859 capturesthe true Oregon for Oregonians, its admirers and visitors. Oregon is a wealth of recreational, ecological, historicaland entrepreneurial intrigue. We’re pioneers in the sustainable movement; we’re bike geeks and techies, NativeAmericans and cowboys, financiers and vintners. We’re urban, suburban, rural and ranch. 1859 Oregon’sMagazine is the vehicle that folks from Pendleton to The Pearl District, from Bend to Bandon, recognize as theirown. In an intelligent and beautiful format, 1859 explores the landscapes, the personalities, the movers andshakers, the history and the architecture that is the jewel of the Pacific Northwest. For Oregonians, 1859 is anexploration of the state’s rich history, its incredible destinations and colorful personalities.
About the Oregon ADDYs
Following a focus group of advertising industry participants and much discussion, the Drakes Committee andAdvertising Federation of C.O. (AdFed) Board created a state-wide ADDY® competition, now called the OregonADDY® Awards. The ADDY® Awards represent the true spirit of creative excellence by recognizing all forms ofadvertising from media of all types, creative by all sizes and entrants of all levels.
About the Western Publications Association (WPA)
The WPA has represented magazine publishers and related companies for more than fifty-seven years. Servingthose publications west of the Mississippi, the WPA is committed to responding to the challenges and opportunitiesfacing the ever-changing magazine industry. For more information, visit www.wpa-online.org. For more informationon the Western Publications Association, please visit wpa-online.org.
For more information on 1859 Oregon’s Magazine, contact Megan Oliver at 541.550.7081, ext. 513, or email her atmegan@1859magazine.com.

allison-hotel-lodging-willamette-valley-oregon-travel-wine

Best Lodging in Willamette Valley Wine Country

When visiting the Willamette Valley’s wine country, often the hardest decision isn’t where to go tasting or dining but where to rest your head after all the sipping and supping. Sure there are a few inexpensive motels around, but with several distinctive and romantic accommodations, why not make it a more memorable experience? Here are some of my favorites:

2011-Winter-1859-Oregon-s-Magazine-cover-525-x-629

What is Your Favorite 2011 Cover?

Four 1859 covers adorned newsstands in 2011. Which was your favorite? Click here to cast your vote now!

2012-Winter-Oregon-Interviews-Ventures-Willamette-Valley-Oregon-State-University-Food-Innovation-Center-Sensory-Scientist-Ann-Colonna-close-up

Oregon’s Most Sensory Woman

Somewhere between living in France, mastering Julia Child’s ‘Turducken’ and earning degrees in biochemistry, chemistry and mathematics, Ann Colonna made a life-change that blended her love of science and food.

Winter-2012-Oregon-Ventures-Dave-s-Killer-Bread-Dave-Dahl-in-pile-of-bread

Dave’s Killer Bread

Dave Dahl is remarkably composed as he recalls the decades when addiction and depression ruled his life. His résumé at one point was a rap sheet chock full of crime and drugs. But even more remarkable is the way he turned his life around. Today, as the president of the Dave’s Killer Bread juggernaut, Dahl’s story of redemption has become intimately intertwined with the bread he makes—in fact, a bit of his story is on the package of every loaf.

Winter-2012-Central-Oregon-Bend-Ventures-Oregon-Adaptive-Sports-mono-skier

Oregon Adaptive Sports

This was not what Kendall Cook had in mind when he dropped out of the University of Oregon in 1993 to be a ski bum. When he was visiting a friend who was teaching adaptive skiing in Breckenridge, Colorado, an instructor left, and Cook filled the spot, helping people with disabilities learn to ski a different way. Cook had grown up ski racing in Montana, but had never taught skiing and didn’t even know any skiers with disabilities.

2011-Autumn-Central-Oregon-Ventures-Bend-Breedlove-Guitars-and-Two-Old-Hippies-Guitar-man-playing-guitar

Guitar Manufacturers Form Partnership

Though there was no rainy outdoor concert to commemorate it, no tie-dyes made for the occasion and no ten-bong salute, the combination of Two Old Hippies Guitar and Breedlove Guitars was acoustic harmony with roots in the ’60s.

1859 Writers’ Guidelines

Thank you for your interest in 1859 Oregon’s Magazine, the magazine about how Oregonians live, work and play. 1859 is a high-quality, regional magazine published monthly by Statehood Media. Articles are written primarily by freelance writers. In an intelligent and beautiful format, 1859 explores the landscapes,the personalities, the movers and shakers, the history and the architecture that is the jewel of the Pacific Northwest. For Oregonians, 1859 is an exploration of the state’s rich history, its incredible destinations and colorful personalities. Departments like “Food & Home,” “Ventures” and “Local Habit” will resonate with residents of Oregon. Departments like “Trip Planner” and “Adventures” are visual and editorial pollen that attracts the travel bee. Before pitching ideas for stories, please look over the past copies of 1859 or visit our website at 1859magazine.com. We look for writers with a strong knowledge of their subject and a love of Oregon. To query, send a brief letter…

2011-Autumn-Oregon-Politics-Executive-Director-Central-Oregon-LandWatch-Paul-Dewey

Sound Off: Skyline Forest

The Skyline Forest is a 33,000-acre tree farm west of Bend that was once owned by timber company Crown Pacific. In 2003, Crown Pacific filed for bankruptcy, and its assets went to its creditors. Ownership of Skyline Forest fell to Fidelity National Financial of Jacksonville, Florida and its subsidiary, Fidelity National Timber Resources. The dissolution of Crown Pacific and its use as timber lands led to a struggle with many stakeholders. The plot’s owner, Fidelity, seeks legislation that would change Skyline Forest’s land use to accommodate residential units.

vernon t williams, wei wang, oregon state university, oregon research

Interview: Solar Energy Research

Wei Wang sat down in his lab at Oregon State University with an inkjet printer and an interesting question. Why can’t solar cells be made simply by printing them with an inkjet printer filled with a solution of solar-transmitting compound? His answer was the subject of a four-page research paper published in the industry journal Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells and the focus of an article from the BBC. The 28-year-old Ph.D. candidate from Shanxi Province, China had discovered an easy process for making solar cells with a printer, a substrate and a combination of metal salts called CIGS. Wang’s discovery could revolutionize the solar industry as a cheap and environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional siliconbased solar cell, and, as a by-product, bring inkjets back into the avant garde.