Think Oregon

Pendleton Round Up: First Color Photos 1948

This photo archive was prepared for 1859 magazine by one of our readers, Mitchell Kaba. They are most likely the first color photographs of the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla people at the Pendleton Round Up in 1948.

The Bend Brewfest

Sponsored Content Written by Beau Eastes    The Bend Brewfest is boldly going where no brew festival in Central Oregon has ever gone before. For the first time in its hop-soaked history, the Bend Brewfest will pour more than 200 different beers and ciders, giving festivalgoers more options than ever at the three-day beer fest held at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater, Aug. 10-12 of this year. “There’s just a huge amount of interest each year from breweries all around the region,” said Brewfest director Marney Smith, whose event drew nearly 40,000 people in 2016. Now in its fifteenth year, the Bend Brewfest will feature 85+ breweries, cider houses and winemakers, a record number of participants for Oregon’s largest craft brew celebration east of the Cascades. “It’s a really great mix of breweries you know and love along with those newer, upstart beer makers you’ve been dying to try,” Smith added….

The Junebugs

Known for their genre-bending originals and energetic, folk-inspired covers, the Junebugs are releasing a new album, “Brothers in Music” August 5 at Mississippi Studios with opening performances by Balto and Falcon Heart.

A billet of highly enriched uranium

Mushroom Clouds & Dollar Signs

Learn the hidden history of the uranium mining in Oregon. When atomic metals were discovered in Klamath Falls, the uranium rush was on.

wallowa county

Hope in the Wallowas

In 1994, protesters tarred and feathered effigies of two local environmentalists and hanged the figures in downtown Joseph. The anger was born of anxiety. Sawmills were closing, jobs were evaporating, young people were leaving, and many residents blamed changes in federal environmental policy, which now prioritized habitat restoration over Wallowa County’s traditional sources of income—timber harvest and ranching. The Timber Wars were in full swing, forestry jobs were disappearing, and environmentalists were seen as the enemy.

mount hood

Exploring the Oregon Trail

For many, the words “Oregon Trail” conjure happy childhood memories of hopping on old-school computers to transform oneself into a fearless wagon leader. Hours swiftly passed as we guided settlers from Independence, Missouri to Oregon’s Willamette Valley along the 2,170-mile emigrant wagon trail. On a good day in this wildly popular fantasy-land set in the 1850s, you’d hunt enough game for a hearty bison dinner for you and your team; on a really bad day, you’d die of cholera or a pesky snakebite.

Pickathon

Into the Woods: Pickathon

For the 19th year, Pendarvis Farm in Happy Valley, Oregon, transforms into an “elaborate fantasy setting” of sensational live music, local food and drink and feel-good community.  At Pickathon, stages pop up inside dreamy barns draped with twinkly lights and built into wooded alcoves, where haystacks and hammocks lure listeners of all ages.

StumpTown Kilts

If clothes make the man then kilts suggest the wearer has a corporeal level of confidence. StumpTown Kilts is a destination location in Portland. Appointments are encouraged but there are Saturday store hours at the makers space Manifestation Warehouse. Within the studios is hipster couture you can’t find downtown: kilts.

Stephanie Whitlock

Stephanie Whitlock

Stephanie Whitlock is the new executive director of the Architectural Heritage Center in Portland, a nonprofit that seeks to conserve the art, craft and context of historic buildings and places in an effort to promote the city’s cult

oregon city

Oregon City—Then & Now

In 2018, the Oregon Trail celebrates its 175th anniversary. Traders laid the 2,170-plus-mile wagon route from about 1811 to 1840. Between the boom years of 1840 and 1860, more than 400,000-plus pioneers traveled its path. Connecting the Missouri River to Oregon’s lush valleys, the east-west trail was only passable on foot or by horseback, and those who braved it faced challenges like wagon accidents, disease outbreaks and rushing river crossings.