Explore Oregon

Recreational opportunities abound in the Klamath area.

Klamath Basin Trip Planner

Boxes get checked with ziplines, world-class bird watching, the pristine Crater Lake and a destination resort written by James Sinks Boy, was I mistaken. Growing up in Klamath Falls, I’d routinely complain there was nothing to do. A teenager thing, sure, but sort of ridiculous in retrospect when—as an adult—you’re attempting to narrow lengthy lists of potential adventure ideas. Adrenaline-fueled bouncing on the Klamath River and soaring among treetops on ziplines. Golfing the state’s only Arnold Palmer-designed links. Paddling creeks and among otters. Exploring conflict-laden history. Disappearing into volcanic caves. Fishing on more than sixty lakes. Getting a people’s-eye view of migratory birds. And that doesn’t even count the region’s crown jewel: Crater Lake, where you can easily lose an entire day, and then some. Turns out, there’s almost too much to do. (Mom was right.) While officially a high desert at 4,200 feet, the Klamath Basin—straddling the Oregon-California border…

Linda English cycles past flowers along the Tidbits ride.

Three Gravel Tours to Do in Oregon This Summer

From multi-day challenges to shorter routes, gravel biking takes you beyond the known written by Jen Sotolongo Over the past decade or so, gravel riding has emerged as an alluring cycling discipline. The draw of riding along oft-traveled dirt roads through remote areas filled with towering trees and breathtaking landscapes entices riders seeking a quieter and mostly car-free alternative to pavement without the skills required for mountain biking. With more than 71,000 miles of unpaved roads throughout the state, Oregon stands out as a veritable haven for two-wheeled off-road adventure. Gravel bikes typically resemble road bikes, only accommodate wider tires and a more upright and longer frame for stability on the slippery gravel. Ranging from hard-packed dirt to more humbling steep climbs and descents over loose rock, beginners and advanced riders alike can find a suitable gravel ride that meets their skill level. From single-day grinds to multi-day backcountry tours,…

TenZen Springs & Cabins features six contemporary cabins.

TenZen Springs & Cabins

written by Kerry Newberryphotography by TenZen Springs & Cabins Perched on a bluff that overlooks the serpentine Wind River, this all-season retreat is the perfect place to spend time soaking in nature. Home to six contemporary cabins and surrounded by expansive meadows and evergreen trees in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge, there’s a quiet solace and restorative spirit that prevails here. In part, that’s due to the prime attraction. All six private cabins have an open-air infinity tub along with a Japanese-inspired outdoor shower and deck. Sourced from an underground aquifer 3,000 feet below the Wind River, pure geothermal spring water continuously and sustainably flows through each cabin’s private tub—a reminder of how water is a balm. But a stay at TenZen also proves that less is more. Set on 100 acres in a minimalist setting, it’s easy to unplug. Open the French doors to the soaking room…

Sol Duc Falls is one of the most photographed spots in the Olympic Peninsula.

Olympic Peninsula + Forks

In the Olympic National Forest, enjoy the silence (among other things) written by James Sinks HOLD COMPLETELY STILL. Listen. And you will hear absolutely nothing. And that is precisely the point. Like following a map to hidden treasure, we’d ventured 3 miles on the Hoh River Trail into the fern-filled temperate rainforest in Washington’s Olympic National Park. In the shade of towering giants, we crawled under fallen trees, sidestepped through an arch formed by a Sitka Spruce, balanced on makeshift bridges over bogs, and waved hello to a family of pheasant, not knowing who was more surprised. And then, on an overgrown carpet of moss on a massive log, there was the place. The One Square Inch of Silence. The spot—marked by a red-painted stone, about one inch across—helps to draw a remarkable contrast to the world elsewhere, and how relentlessly noisy it can be. Here, in this place, the…

Out ‘N’ About Treehouse Treesort features an assemblage of unusual stays perfect for a memorable summer getaway.

Sleeping in the Trees

Once weekend play for kids, treehouses are now fit for even picky parents written by Joni Kabana Looking for someplace unique to get away from it all? Many know Southern Oregon boasts one of the largest concentrations of old-growth trees in the nation, but did you know that this region in Oregon also is home to one of the largest concentrations of treehouses in the world? Out ‘N’ About Treehouse Treesort in Cave Junction is a collection of treehouses that can be rented for a bird’s-eye chance to sleep high up in a mighty old tree. Staying at one of these treehouses will catapult you back to your good old backyard treehouse childhood days or satisfy your best Robinson Crusoe lifestyle fantasy. With names such as the Serendipitree and the Tree Room Schoolhouse Suite, each treehouse was built with fun and adventure, and a bit of humor in mind. The…

Cog Wild mountain bikers ride Farewell Trail in Bend near Tumalo Falls.

Summer Camps for Adults

Five camps, clinics and retreats where you can get unstuck and reach new summits written by Jen Sotolongo Thank summer camp is just for kids? Think again. The adventures and fun don’t have to stop just because you’re an adult. From river rafting to trail running or mountain biking, personal development and rock climbing, there’s a camp for all types of outdoor adventures, from newbies to expert enthusiasts. VARIOUS LOCATIONS Cog Wild Mountain Biking Camps Based out of Bend, Cog Wild has run multi-day mountain biking trips for intermediate and expert riders in Oregon since 2006. Trips take place in some of the top mountain biking destinations in the state, including the Mt. Hood region, McKenzie River, the Umpqua Valley and Oakridge. Designed for expert riders who don’t mind a little hike-a-bike and big climbs, the three-day Umpqua Trip Timpanogos trip hits some of the favorite trails on the North…

Field-biologist-turned-beekeeper Matt Allen launched Apricot Apiaries in Kimberly.

The Accidental Apiary

A curiosity became a buzzing business written by Joni Kabana Tucked away on one of the most gorgeous stretches of the North Fork of the John Day River sits a honey stand chock full of honey and wonder. From various seasonal flavors of raw honey to exquisitely crafted beeswax candles to sweet honeystix that can be tucked in your workday pocket, this little hand-built stand is well worth a slow and meandering drive through Eastern Oregon high desert’s sweeping vistas to reach it. After moving to Kimberly in 2009 while splitting his time working as a field biologist in Nevada, Matt Allen purchased two beehives to fulfill his curiosity of insects and biology. Quickly, his hobby turned to obsession and launched Apricot Apiaries to sell not only honey and bi-products, but also queen bees, nucs and pollination services for fruits and nuts. Situated next to Thomas Orchards (another fruit-loving reason…

The trail networks around Boise make it a mecca for runners and their dogs.

Boise

Big outdoors and a small Basque community make this Idaho locale worth a springtime getaway written by James Sinksphotography by Visit Idaho Wednesdays and Fridays on Grove Street in downtown Boise, a line of hungry noontime patrons forms outside the Basque Market, as a giant pan of steaming saffron-seasoned paella simmers on an outdoor stove. The biweekly culinary pilgrimage celebrates the city’s Basque heritage, which traces to the influx of immigrants that began arriving in the 1800s from near the France-Spain border. Initially searching for gold in the West, Basques were sought to tend the huge flocks of hungry sheep that once chomped their way through the surrounding high country and range. Today, the Idaho state capital is home to the continent’s biggest Basque community and, while many cities have Chinatowns, Boise boasts the Basque Block. Roam between former boarding houses and shops, experience authentic Iberian fare like pintxos (think…

Oregon Caves National Monument in Southern Oregon is a fascinating tour of the unexepected underworld.

Cave Junction Trip Planner

A town built around a dog’s discovery written by James Sinks Is it southwest Oregon’s Redwood Highway into Cave Junction, or are you following the yellow brick road? Maybe both. The ribbon of asphalt meanders through odd foliage to whimsical art and mystical creatures (and real lions), to where houses float above the ground, to fields of intoxicating flowers, and to where you can gain plenty of courage (at least, the liquid sort). No munchkins—true—but plenty to munch on. And while you won’t find Toto, Dorothy’s trusty companion in The Wizard of Oz, the community owes much to a different famous dog, Bruno. In 1874, Bruno and a hunter named Elijah Davidson were tracking a bear when the dog disappeared behind underbrush. Davidson followed and found himself in the stunning crystallized caverns that now anchor the Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve. Today tens of thousands of visitors annually roam…