Elizabeth Chambers Cellar

Elizabeth Chambers Cellar is a boutique winery specializing in handcrafted micro-regional Pinot Noir made in McMinnville, the heart of Oregon Wine Country. We invite you to start (or continue) your own love affair with Pinot Noir by discovering our world-class wines. Visit us at our historic winery and tasting room, an idyllic getaway in the heart of McMinnville where we proudly pour our lush, fruit-forward Pinot Noir, Rosé and Pinot Gris daily and host fun-filled events throughout the year. Purchase a selection of our elegant, well-made wines to share at your next family gathering, raise in an intimate toast, or lay down for a truly special occasion in the future. To enjoy an unparalleled experience, exclusive benefits, and access to our inaugural release of Chardonnay in early 2019, we invite you to consider membership in our Collector’s Club or Connoisseur’s Club. We are honored to share these wines with you…

A Wine Country Thanksgiving

Gastronomy: A Wine Country Thanksgiving in the Willamette Valley written by Jen Stevenson Eschew the mall madness and super sale insanity of Black Friday in favor of a far more elegant and enjoyable holiday season kickoff—the Willamette Valley’s 36th annual Wine Country Thanksgiving. From Friday, November 23, to Sunday, November 25, more than 150 participating wineries from Appolloni to Antiquum will feature special tastings, festive flights, food pairings, live music, winemaker meet-and-greets, artisan markets and holiday discounts, because nothing fills out a stocking better than a bottle of Dundee Hills pinot noir. With the mad scramble of harvest a near-distant memory, brilliantly hued fall foliage still clinging to the vines, and the worst of winter gales still to come, this is one of the best times of year to visit the valley. Make a weekend of it with a romantic retreat at Newberg’s tony Allison Inn and Spa, or the Atticus…

Independence, Oregon: A Small Town with Advancing Technology

Independence, Oregon: A Small Town with Advancing Technology

How one small town is embracing tech written by Sheila G. Miller EVERY FOURTH OF JULY, as many as 25,000 people flock to the city of Independence, Oregon — population 9,666 — to celebrate the holiday with a multiday festival. “The town grinds to a halt,” said Shaun Irvine, the city’s economic development director. “Staffing is never quite enough. We needed a way to be more efficient.” This year, it would be different. Working with TeamDev, the city plans to create a virtual situation room to make the festival smarter. Irvine described it as, essentially, a map of the community with real-time updates—traffic incidents, police calls, live video streams, employees’ locations. Garbage can sensors can tell employees when it’s time to empty them. Employees will be able to monitor social media. “We’ll be able to know if someone’s in the park and tweets at a friend that the bathroom is…

Mount Angel’s First Oktoberfest

One of the reasons we look so forward to fall is the Mt. Angel Oktoberfest. This beautiful Bavarian-style town in Oregon certainly knows how to throw a party. With the 52nd annual celebration coming up this weekend we decided to take look back at how it all got started.

Eugene in the Fall

Looking for fall splendor when the leaves start to change? Plan your trip to Eugene.

Oregon City—Then & Now

In 2018, the Oregon Trail celebrates its 175th anniversary. Traders laid the 2,170-plus-mile wagon route from about 1811 to 1840. Between the boom years of 1840 and 1860, more than 400,000-plus pioneers traveled its path. Connecting the Missouri River to Oregon’s lush valleys, the east-west trail was only passable on foot or by horseback, and those who braved it faced challenges like wagon accidents, disease outbreaks and rushing river crossings.