Friday, April 1, 2011

Oregon Grass-Fed Beef

From the grasses of northeast Oregon to tables across the state

By Lynne Sampson Curry

Jill McClaran ranches the same way it was done 100 years ago beneath the Wallowas. /
Photo by Joe Whittle
Jill McClaran ranches the same way it was done 100 years ago beneath the Wallowas. / Photo by Joe Whittle
Jill McClaran with her horse in tow. / Photo by Joe Whittle
Jill McClaran with her horse in tow. / Photo by Joe Whittle
The McClaran family at their ranch. / Photo by Joe Whittle
The McClaran family at their ranch. / Photo by Joe Whittle
Grass- and hay-fed cattle. /
Photo by Joe Whittle
Grass- and hay-fed cattle. / Photo by Joe Whittle
Jill McClaran starts her day. /
Photo by Joe Whittle
Jill McClaran starts her day. / Photo by Joe Whittle
'The flavor and texture of the beef is far better than that raised by conventional means. We benefit by having fresh and local products, and they sustain their way of life.' —Matthew Barnes, The Prodigal Son Brewery & Pub /
Photo by Joe Whittle
"The flavor and texture of the beef is far better than that raised by conventional means. We benefit by having fresh and local products, and they sustain their way of life." —Matthew Barnes, The Prodigal Son Brewery & Pub / Photo by Joe Whittle
'People really want to know where their beef comes from,' says Dan Probert, CNB's executive director, 'and are willing to pay more for it.' /
Photo by Joe Whittle
"People really want to know where their beef comes from," says Dan Probert, CNB's executive director, "and are willing to pay more for it." / Photo by Joe Whittle
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Beef Label Primer

With more beef options in the meat case, it’s hard to know what you’re buying. here’s a breakdown of each label’s definition and where to find the beef.

Organic

A USDA certification with strict requirements for certified organic grain or grass, no growth hormones or
antibiotics. Search tilth.org to locate Oregon producers.

Grass-fed

This beef comes from animals that consumed only mother’s milk and forage, including grasses and hay, for their entire lives. Available seasonally at farmers markets and direct sales from the ranch.

Natural

An indication that the meat was raised without hormones or antibiotics. Naturally raised animals are
pasture-raised and typically spend three to six months in a feedlot on an all-vegetarian (no animal byproduct) ration, called “grain-finished.” Available at Whole Foods and selected supermarkets statewide.

 

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